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26 Chef-Approved Kitchen Gadgets You’ll Actually Use

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26 Chef-Approved Kitchen Gadgets You’ll Actually Use

There are thousands of kitchen gadgets out there. It’s really hard to know what’s worth the money and what isn’t. Luckily, there are people out there who use these gadgets like it’s their job (because it actually is).

That’s why we turned to personal and professional chefs to find out what kitchen gadgets they use in their own kitchens. Here are the gadgets they approve of.

HuffPost may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page. Prices and availability subject to change.





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Low-Income Voters Were Key To Toppling Trump, Study Finds

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Low-Income Voters Were Key To Toppling Trump, Study Finds

Often dismissed by political pundits as disaffected and disorganized, low-income voters played a key role in Donald Trump’s defeat in the presidential election, according to a new study.

High turnout among low-income voters in the 2020 election — especially in battleground states — helped deliver victories for Joe Biden and Democrats in the Senate and House, concluded the study, “Waking the Sleeping Giant,” by the Poor People’s Campaign. The organization, an advocate for low-income Americans, launched a nonpartisan voter registration drive ahead of the 2020 vote across 16 states.

The reason poor and low-income voters have traditionally participated in elections at lower rates “is not because they have no interest in politics, but because politics is not interested in them,” Poor People’s Campaign co-chairs Rev. Dr. William Barber II and Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis wrote in the foreword to the report released Friday.

“They do not hear their needs and demands from candidates or feel that their votes matter,” they added.

They are also less likely to vote because of illness, disability, transportation issues, and the rise of voter suppression laws — “all systemic barriers,” the authors added.

But the 2020 elections saw the highest voter turnout in U.S.history, including among poor and low-income voters, noted the study.

Of the 168 million Americans who voted last year, 59 million of them— 35% of the total — had an estimated annual household income of less than $50,000, classifying them as “poor” or low-income, the analysis found.

Where the margin of Biden’s victory was a squeaker-thin 3% or less, low-income Americans accounted for 34% to 45% of the voting population (Arizona 39.96%), Georgia (37.84%), Michigan (37.81%), Nevada (35.78%), North Carolina (43.67%), Pennsylvania (34.12%) and Wisconsin (39.80%), according to the study.

The low-income voters included large numbers of white Americans as well as people of color.

The figures “challenge … the media-driven narrative that … white low-income voters are the de facto base of the Republican Party and delivered Donald Trump into the White House” in 2016, wrote study author Shailly Gupta Barnes.

“The findings suggest that, rather than writing white low-income voters off, it is possible to build coalitions of low-income voters across race around a political agenda that centers the issues they have in common,” she added.

To keep the key segment of the population coming to the polls, however, lawmakers must support agendas that speak to those voters, the report concludes.

The Poor People’s Campaign also supports legislation to outlaw partisan gerrymandering, expand early voting, and establish a national automatic voter registration system.

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Hollywood Workers Secure Deal With Studios, Averting Strike

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Hollywood Workers Secure Deal With Studios, Averting Strike

Workers in Hollywood created thousands of picket signs in recent days, but they may not need them after all.

The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts (IATSE) reached a tentative agreement on a new contract with the major film studios late Saturday. The union had said that 60,000 workers would walk off the job if such an agreement hadn’t been reached by midnight Sunday night.

Jarryd Gonzales, a spokesperson for the the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP, the industry group representing TV and film studios, confirmed the deal to HuffPost. Deadline was first to report there was an agreement.

IATSE said the two sides had agreed to a deal covering industry workers in Hollywood, but had yet to finalize a deal for workers under contract outside Los Angeles. However, IATSE President Matthew Loeb called it a “Hollywood ending” in a statement, suggesting he was confident workers would not end up on the picket line.

The union said the deal for what’s known as the Hollywood “basic agreement” included a living wage for the lowest earners; higher pay for streaming content; 3% annual wage increases; a minimum 10-hour “turnaround” time, guaranteeing workers that much time off between shifts; and at least 54 hours of rest over the weekend, among other provisions. The union did not release a full draft of the agreement.

The union said it was still working on a tentative deal for workers under what’s known as the “area standards” agreement, which mostly covers workers outside Hollywood.

Any tentative contracts would still have to be reviewed and ratified by membership. Had workers been called to strike, it would have been the largest work stoppage in the U.S. private sector since 2007.

IATSE represents film and TV workers known as “below-the-line” crew because they fall beneath the well-known actors, directors and producers on budget sheets. They work as camera technicians, editors, script coordinators and other unseen personnel who are essential to show business.

The strike threat reflected years of frustration over the working conditions in Los Angeles and smaller film hubs around the country.

In recent weeks, IATSE members shared stories of working 14-plus-hour days and not seeing their families. They demanded stronger protections for rest and recuperation. They also wanted to boost the wage scale for work done on streaming projects, since studios have been able to pay workers less for that work compared to traditional film and TV.

Loeb told HuffPost last week that the two sides had made progress in negotiations, but that workers were still determined to win language in the contract discouraging brutally long workdays.

“It’s about family life,” Loeb said. “It’s about rest and health and safety on the job and coming home from the job.”

IATSE had more than 30 bargaining sessions with the AMPTP, which includes Disney, Netflix, Warner Bros., Amazon and other studios.

Earlier this month, IATSE held a strike vote in order to determine whether members were willing to walk off the job if the union’s negotiators felt the studios were not offering a satisfactory deal. Roughly 90% of eligible members cast ballots, and more than 98% voted to authorize a strike.

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Hollywood crew members reach a tentative deal with major studios, averting a strike

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Hollywood crew members reach a tentative deal with major studios, averting a strike


The Hollywood sign above homes in the Hollywood Hills.

Hollywood crew members and major studios have averted a nationwide strike, according to AP. Earlier this month, crew members in the union IATSE, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, voted to authorize a strike if they couldn’t reach a deal with the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP). They’d been negotiating over pay, work schedules and more since May. A strike would have effectively shut down much of the film and TV production in the country. The union announced today that they’ve reached a deal.

At issue were quality of life issues and the health and safety of those who work behind the scenes in the film and television industry. That includes cinematographers, lighting technicians, makeup artists and the food workers who feed the casts and crews.

In recent weeks, many have been sharing their stories on social media, where some have complained of grueling call times that cause sleep deprivation and little time to be with their families. Some were asking to be compensated more for productions that are streamed online and not released theatrically. They’ve been working with lower rates since 2009, when the streamers were just beginning.

The arts and entertainment industries have been hit particularly hard by the pandemic. According to a recent report by Americans for the Arts, 63% of artists and creative workers were unemployed at the height of the pandemic in 2020.



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